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Lady Knight (Protector of the Small 4) by Tamora Pierce

Lady Knight (Protector of the Small 4) by Tamora Pierce

Brief Summary: 4th book in a series. Keladry of Mindelan finally becomes a knight. She has proved those who doubted her wrong. With the war on, Kel is ready for duty, but the Chamber of Ordeal gives Kel a task, to destroy a man who steals children’s souls for dark magic. A task she can’t accomplish once the King gives her orders, she is put in charge of a refugee camp. Will she be able to save the children in time without deserting her post?

Read my reviews for the first book First Test, second book Page, and the third book Squire.

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I don’t know how many times I’ve re-read this series. It’s by far my favorite out of all ones set in Tortall and it’s the second that I read. The only things that irritated me were the over-explanation and wordiness. Although I don’t know how much time passed between publication dates of the third book and the fourth book, I still don’t think you should be reminding people about things that happened in the previous three books. I do understand the reasoning for it.


As I’ve said, this is my favorite series by Tamora Pierce. Kel is a great heroine, whose need for perfection is her biggest fault. But she’s smart, brave, caring and extremely loyal to those she loves. I also love all of the supporting characters, Neal and Merric and Owen. Tobie was the new one and he’s also great. The animals were kind of in the background here, but I guess it was because of the sweeping story line, so we didn’t get to focus on the smaller details.

Either way, this is a great finish to a series. In fact I didn’t want it to finish. I want more of Kel!! 

Squire (Protector of the Small 3) by Tamora Pierce

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Squire (Protector of the Small 3) by Tamora Pierce

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Brief Summary:  Third book of a series. Keladry of Mindelan has made it through her page training and has become a squire. But she still has a lot to prove to assholes who doubt her. When Kel is chosen by the legendary Lord Raoul to be his squire, Kel may think her troubles are over… but they’re really just beginning.

Read my reviews for the first book First Test and second book Page.

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This is the best Protector of the Small book by far. Kel finally becomes a squire, and while she’s worried that no one will pick her or worse she’ll be chosen by a desk knight—her fears are soon proved wrong and she’s chosen by one of the best. By Lord Raoul of the Kingsguard.

Now, I loved Raoul and Kel’s teacher student dynamic. They just work so well together. Raoul is a great teacher, I think the best that Kel could have hoped for, and Kel with her smarts and patience is a great match for him as a student.

I did miss some of the earlier characters like Lalasa and Neal, and I wasn’t too invested in Kel/Cleon, but it was all well enough. We have to say goodbye to one of the animal friends though, which is extremely sad… but I think also signaled the time for growing up.

This is a great continuation of the series!

Page (Protector of the Small 2) by Tamora Pierce

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Page (Protector of the Small 2) by Tamora Pierce

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Brief Summary: Sequel to First Test. Kel passed her probationary year and is now studying as a page, but she still has to face bullies, sexism, and misogyny. Kel spends her time defending first-year pages from bullies, staying on top of homework, conquering her paralyzing fear of heights, and keeping up with Lord Wyldon’s grueling physical training schedule.

Read my review for the first book First Test.

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This is a great continuation to the Protector of the Small series. The world expands, we meet more characters, and we get to see more of the world.

While I do love Kel with all my heart, sometimes she’s just so painfully… I don’t even know how to describe it… pragmatic and self-righteous? I mean, I know she’s thirteen and I mean what tween doesn’t think they’re always right about everything. But sometimes, it just makes her blind to the most obvious things. Like Wyldon for example; she recognizes that when he makes her work at a height, he is helping her deal with her fear in a productive manner. However, she somehow fails to see that during lessons, when he corrects her, or when he makes her tilting targets harder than the boy’s he’s actually complimenting her and raising the stakes every time her skills increase. 

The bullying also, at one point it almost seems that Kel wants Joren and the gang to be out bullying so they can beat them up. And while I understand the feeling of wanting to be a hero, I’d understand it from her friends, but I’d think that Kel of all people would be happy that they’re not out and about.

I basically love all the supporting characters. I love Neal and Owen (i kind of love the little guy), and Jump and the sparrows!!! And Lalasa.

This is the series in which Tamora begins to explore social issues. Especially in terms of nobles vs servants and freemen. Servants have no power at all, and when it comes to their own word against their masters’ it’s unlikely they’ll win, worse their own kind will turn against them.

We also get more POC and LGBTA representation, so of course many people would probably not pick up on the latter with Lalasa. Though Kel’s statement works well two.

First Test (Protector of the Small 1) by Tamora Pierce

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First Test (Protector of the Small 1) by Tamora Pierce

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Brief Summary: For the first time in a century, girls are once again permitted to become knights, Keladry of Mindelan (known as Kel) is the first girl to take advantage of the decree that permits females to train for knighthood. However, Kell is gonna have to put up with a lot of misogynistic bullshit like having to serve a year as a test to prove she can keep up with the boys, before she’s allowed to become a page.

This is the third series in set in Tamora Pierce’s Tortall world after Song of the Lioness and The Immortals series.

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Kel is the first girl, since Alanna became a knight and King Jon declared that girls could try out for the shield, to apply for knight’s training. However, the current knight training master, Wyldon, doesn’t want a girl in his midst, and demands that she serve a probationary year before he decides whether she’s worthy to train at all. I still felt that outrage of unfairness, even though I knew she would make it. I think for the first time, I also see Wyldon’s hypocrisy, of saying that Kel has to be able to keep up with the boys and saying she will not be receiving any special treatment—But, at every opportunity, Wyldon reminds everyone that not only is she a girl, he makes comments about her inability to keep up, and constantly brings up her probationary status. I thought the point was not to treat her any different? Wyldon may be a hypocritical assbutt, but he does have a heart, and I do like him as a character.

Kel is a great character. Sometimes she can be somewhat of an insufferable goody-to-shoes, but that’s what also makes her extremely endearing. Her kindness and protectiveness make her great, her fierceness and loyalty to her friends, and her ability not to whine but take what everyone throws at her with humility, but also gives her a drive to prove to everyone that she can do anything she sets her mind too.

These books also have my favorite cast of characters. I love Peachblossom. I love Neal. I love Crown. I can’t even decide which one of them is my favorite because I just love all of them.

Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass 1) by Sarah J Maas

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Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass 1) by Sarah J Maas

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Brief Summary: After a year of slaving in the salt mines, the infamous Adarlan’s Assassin gets a chance of freedom. She is entered in the competition to become the King’s Champion. Things are going well until other contestants start turning up dead… and half eaten.

Possible Spoilers Ahead

I read this book with a lot of baggage, because I’ve read it at it’s conception when it was still called Queen of Glass and was all the rage on FictionPress about seven or eight years ago. So, for me, it was like greeting old friends and jumping back into the world that I so greatly missed. So, I was familiar with the story more or less, and the characters. A lot of the big details changed, so did the plots, but the characters were fairly the same — except for the added ones. It was impossible for me to read the story without comparing it to what I remembered of Queen of Glass, and I will be making comparisons in the review.  

Long review

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The Assassin’s Blade (Throne of Glass Prequels 1-5) by Sarah J. Maas

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The Assassin’s Blade by Sarah J Maas

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In Order: The Assassin and the Pirate Lord, The Assassin and the Healer, The Assassin and the Desert, The Assassin and the Underworld, and The Assassin and of the Empire.

About: Celaena Sardothien is an assassin in training, she’s the best, even though she’s only sixteen. In these novels we get to meet her, as well as a cast of other characters who will appear in later on in the Throne of Glass series. We also get to see the glimpse of the world that Celaena lives in. And how she ends up going to the Salt Mines. 

Overall, this is a good set of stories that introduce the reader to the world of Throne of Glass and Celaena Sardothien. We see how she came to be an assassin, some of her adventures, and how she ends up in the mines of Endovier. The stories are well written and interesting, but some of them don’t seem to be that relevant. They tie together in a nice arc, documenting Celaena’s downfall, but on their own they’re kind of pointless. Honestly, this could have been a book of it’s own. I do think that reading these stories would be beneficial before starting Throne of Glass, or maybe after the first book, but only if you’re really set on reading the entire series. I think the books explain Celaena’s character a lot and make her more likable.

Individual Reviews Under the Cut

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The Realms of the Gods (The Immortals 4) by Tamora Pierce

The Realms of the Gods (The Immortals 4) by Tamora Pierce

Brief Summary: During a battle against immortal monsters, Daine and Numair are sucked into the divine realms, when Daine nearly dies. They are needed back home because the battle against Ozorne is not going well, but that may not be easy. But at least Daine finds out her parentage, and gains valuable friends and allies in the war they’re currently losing. This is the fourth and final book in The Immortals Quartet.

Read my review for the first book Wild Magicthe second book Wolf-Speaker, and third book Emperor Mage.

A great finish to the series!

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Emperor Mage (The Immortals 3) by Tamora Pierce

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Emperor Mage (The Immortals 3) by Tamora Pierce

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Brief Summary: Daine and Numair are part of the diplomatic delegation that goes to Carthak to try to make peace between them and Tortall. Dealing with a dangerous, finicky emperor is hard enough, but when Carthak’s goddess starts meddling and using Daine as a vessel and signs of ill omens begin to appear all over Carthak, it becomes clear peacemaking peace between two nations on the brink of war may not be easy. This is a third book in The Immortals quartet.

Read my review for the first book Wild Magic and the second book Wolf-Speaker.

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Wolf-Speaker (The Immortals 2) by Tamora Pierce

Wolf-Speaker (The Immortals 2) by Tamora Pierce

Brief Summary: The wolf pack that Daine once ran with send for her help, the valley that they’re living in is being destroyed by humans. When Daine and Numair answer the call for help, they discover that things are more sinister than they seem, and that the entire kingdom may be in trouble. This is a second book in The Immortals quartet.

Read my review for the first book: Wild Magic.

Possible Mild Spoilers.

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Wild Magic (The Immortals 1) by Tamora Pierce

Wild Magic (The Immortals 1) by Tamora Pierce

Brief Summary: Daine has an uncanny ability to understand and speak to animals. But she realizes it’s so much more when she winds up in Tortall after being forced to leave her home. Daine makes new friends, who help her discover her special type of magic, just when the monsters who’ve been imprisoned in the Divine Realms return to Tortall.

The Immortals series is set in the same world as Song of the Lioness quartet and a further extension of Tortall universe, set nine years later.  

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The one thing I noticed immediately was the drastic improvement in Tamora Pierce’s writing from the Song of the Lioness series. While a bit dense with detail sometimes, the writing can breathe now without summarizing important details. So, if you’re one of the people who wasn’t quite sold on Tamora Pierce or Tortall with the first series, I definitely recommend you read the Immortals before giving up.

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